Harriet’s antics will make
readers laugh with sheer delight

Angela Groutsis – Good Reading
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Reviews

Here are some things that other people have said about Harriet Huxtable and the Purpose of Rats.

Louise Pike writes with flair and humour, she captures the breathless pace of an enthusiastic 10-year-old’s thoughts and speech, and her language is wittily original and spontaneous. You may or may not be convinced that rats have a great purpose, but this is a thoroughly enjoyable, positive and accomplished first novel. More please. Upper primary students should enjoy Harriet and her family.
J.S. Reading Time Vol 45 No 4

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This book is a read alone book for developing readers. The story line is interesting and keeps you guessing. The book involves Harriet, - a keen gardener, wanting to get a new compost bin. Her dad – the town garbage collector says that he will only buy her a compost bin if she gets an ‘A’ in one of her projects. Harriet having only got ‘C’s on all of her projects so far. Her teacher gives the class one last project for the year – her last chance. It has to be about a pet, “BUT! The key word for the project is interesting.” Her teacher says. Harriet thinks she has the best pet – a turtle named Boris but later finds something wrong with Boris. Will Harriet find another pet that’s interesting? Will she get that compost bin? Will her clean freak mother find out about her new pet? To find out you have to read it.
I think that the book is humorous, light hearted and well written.
Harry, aged 13, Canberra, ACT on Young Reader Reviews – YARA

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Harriet’s antics will make readers laugh with sheer delight and discover that there is a purpose to rats after all.
Angela GroutsisGood Reading August 2001

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A promising first novel.
Margaret Robson KentAustralian Book Review October 2001

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Adelaide’s newest children’s author is Louise Pike, whose first novel features an engaging 10-year-old, a potential antipodean echo of Beverley Cleary’s hugely popular Ramona.
Pike’s voice is fresh and funny, even if her adult characters are played a bit self-consciously for laughs.
Katharine EnglandThe Advertiser Saturday August 4, 2001

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Louise Pike’s debut novel is a warm, amusing delightful spin on the use (or otherwise) of rats and provides a very entertaining vehicle for the author’s droll humour which underpins the deeper issues of loyalty, friendship and love.
Russ MerrinMagpies Vol 16, No 4 September 2001


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